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Finalists announced for $1m Global Cooling Prize

The backers of the Global Cooling Prize have announced the eight finalists who will compete for the top prize of one million dolllars and runners up prizes worth a further $2 million in total. Entrants were assessed on their technology’s ability to offer have at least five times lower climate impact than that of the baseline AC unit of a 5.3 kW fixed speed split AC unit with an Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) of 3.5 and using R410A refrigerant with a GWP of 2088.

Finalists come from around the world and represent companies large and small: Gree Electric Appliances. of Zhuhai, China; Daikin AirConditioning India;.Godrej and Boyce and ATE of India; S&S Design Startup Solution, also of India; Transaera Inc, M2 Thermal Solutions and Kraton Corporation, all of the US and Barocal of the UK.

The eight teams selected pitched a wide range of technologies, including smart hybrid designs of vapor-compression designs, evaporative cooling designs, and solid-state cooling technologies that use little or no global warming refrigerants.

Sir Richard Branson, Founder and CEO of the Virgin Group and global Ambassador for the Prize said: “It gives me immense satisfaction to say that we have received some absolutely revolutionary cooling ideas, What makes this competition especially exciting is the market transformation opportunity. It could be one of the biggest technology-based steps we can take to arrest climate change. Congratulations to the finalists of the Global Cooling Prize. I look forward to following all of you on your journey to winning the Prize and scaling your solutions globally.”

Representing the UK’s hopes is a start-up spun off from the University of Cambridge, Barocal Ltd. Here researchers at the University of Cambridge’s Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy are developing a solid-state cooling technology to solve the cooling challenge.

This solid-state Barocaloric cooling technology takes advantage of the properties of solid organic “plastic crystal” materials to provide cooling. By applying pressure to these organic solid crystals, it is possible to change their molecular orientation which results in a solid state phase transition, thus causing a change in their entropy (degree of disorder) which leads to a temperature change of the system.

The process of continuously “applying and releasing pressure” on the Barocaloric material results in solid-to-solid phase changes in the crystals which results in large thermal changes due to molecular reconfiguration. This produces a cooling effect which can be delivered either to the room air or to produce chilled water for cooling. These plastic crystals are flexible materials that are widely available and are low-cost and non-toxic. Research shows that the thermodynamic behaviour of these plastic crystal materials is very similar to commonly used refrigerants, which has the potential to create a viable and alternative cooling approach to the century-old vapor compression technology.

CO2 a natural choice for Danish food retailer

DENMARK: Danish refrigeration systems manufacturer Advansor has supplied a transcritical CO2 system with eight Bitzer EcoLine+ reciprocating compressors at a new distribution centre for REMA 1000 supermarkets.

The recently completed warehouse in the Danish city of Vejle will deliver goods to REMA 1000’s shops in western Denmark.

REMA 1000 is a multinational no-frills supermarket chain owned entirely by the Reitan Group. It supports more than 800 subsidiaries in Denmark and Norway.

The REMA 1000 project, which began in the summer of 2018, was described by CO2 systems specialist Advansor as “the biggest compound system in company history”.

The project began in the summer of 2018 with Advansor in charge of planning and realisation of the refrigeration system in collaboration with ICS Industrial Cooling Systems. The system was built from scratch, but the building itself is a former dry-storage warehouse.

The refrigeration system has a total capacity of 940kW at -4°C evaporation temperature and 32°C ambient temperature. And it is quite large, too, at 10.8m long. Six Bitzer EcoLline+ compressors ensure the medium temperature application, while two additional EcoLine+ compressors provide for even greater efficiency in parallel compounding.

Bitzer has has collaborated with Advansor since the German compressor manufacturer first started producing CO2 models, and REMA 1000 already uses Bitzer compressors in all of its shops.

“Bitzer is our preferred supplier. We get around 95% of our compressors from Bitzer,” said Advansor’s business development manager Kenneth Madsen.

He explained that this project marked the first time Advansor had opted for EcoLine+, mainly because of its high efficiency. It was also the company’s first experience with a line start permanent magnet motor (LSPM).

The LSPM motor is said to increase seasonal performance factor by more than 10%. These motors can be connected directly to 50 or 60Hz networks, offering higher efficiencies in both full and part load operation. Permanent magnet motors are robust, easy to use and can operate both directly on the mains network and with frequency inverters.

“Very few other technologies would be suitable for this system. They simply can’t handle the cold climate here,” explained Madsen. “The fancy stuff with ejectors and the like wouldn’t be worth trying out in an application like this. LSPM is a good technology because it works in any climate.” Advansor’s system design combined with LSPM is said to enable a new level of energy efficiency – by more than 10%.

Natural” refrigerants are common in Denmark due to charge size limits on HFC refrigerants which have been in place since 2007.

“In Denmark, it’s probably easier than in other countries for these systems to gain a foothold. But it can still be difficult here.,” explained Kenneth Madsen. “Hydrocarbons would not be an option. Ammonia, perhaps, but most distribution centres and smaller businesses rely on CO2 because it is cheaper to both acquire and operate. Five or 10 years ago, this project would have opted for an ammonia system – but now the focus is on CO2 for such cases.”

“The demand for industrial CO2 systems is constantly increasing, especially with permanent magnet motors, because they save on operating costs and reduce the impact on the climate,” claimed Advansor’s Denmark country manager Casper Christiansen. “Of course, compressors with these motors are more expensive to acquire – but this investment pays off within just a short period of time.”

Compressor talk marks IoR 120th anniversary

UK: The Institute of Refrigeration (IoR) celebrates its 120th anniversary next month with a talk on the history of the HallScrew compressor at the equally historic RAF Museum in Hendon.

The IoR was formed at a meeting chaired by R M Leonard with 16 interested individuals on the 8 December 1899 at the London Chamber of Commerce. Leonard, editor of Cold Storage and Ice Trades Review, a forerunner of RAC magazine, subsequently became the first secretary of the Cold Storage and Ice Association, as it was initially known.

To mark the occasion, Terry Young of J&E Hall will chart the development of the HallScrew compressor, first introduced in 1972 using a concept of single main rotor plus two gate rotors. This talk describes the challenges encountered during the development process, from the first open drive prototype to decades later a compressor that encompasses innovations and advanced design features necessary to meet today’s shifting world of refrigeration.

The joint meeting with the London Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Society will be held at the RAF Museum in Hendon on December 4. Before the presentation, those attending will have the opportunity to explore the Museum and discover the fascinating story of the RAF.

Pricing the right construction projects

What construction projects should you be pricing?

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Some contractors are like some actors. They sign up for every project that crosses their desk.
This often means that the estimating team works long hours and price estimates are rushed. Little thought is put into ways to make the price more attractive to the client.
When pricing is rushed it could result in errors with the price, which could mean that the price is too high, so the company doesn’t win the work anyway. It could also result in the contractor not winning the project. Often it takes more than just having the lowest price to be awarded a construction project.
In addition, contractors may end up winning the wrong project – one which they don’t have the resources or expertise to complete successfully.
Contractors should focus on pricing the right project, then put all their thought and effort into submitting a winning bid.


What is the right construction project for your company?

Construction projects vary hugely in size, type, location, risks, and clients. Not all projects may be suitable for your company right now. In fact, some construction projects are best avoided if they’re excessively risky or the client is difficult.
Picking the wrong project can be disastrous, while the right project can lead to bigger and better projects later. It’s important to understand the project fully when pricing it and be selective about which projects you price.
It’s also important to consider the pricing or bidding procedures.  If there are multiple contractors pricing the project, your chances of winning the project may be slim.
Sometimes there are competitors who have strong relationships with the client, have more expertise in the type of work, or that are already operating in the area. These competitors will have an advantage over your company, and it may be difficult to win the project.
Try to pick construction projects that are winnable. Don’t waste time pricing projects that will be nearly impossible to win.

Conclusion – win the right construction projects

All the above points would seem obvious, yet, it’s surprising how often they aren’t considered by contractors as they get caught up in the excitement and possibilities of pricing a new project. After all, what could go wrong?
This article was first published on the ClockShark website. To visit this website and continue reading the article click on the link above.
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