Request for a Site Survey or Quotation : sales@airco.pk | For Technical Assitance Call : +92-300-4284119

5 Tips on how to safely cut concrete!

​Concrete cutting can be a big part of building or renovation projects

Picture

Picture courtesy of SEQ Concrete Cutting Pty Ltd

Concrete cutting requires incredible precision, proper training, and the right equipment. Due to the complexity of the job, it should be a task reserved only for professionals.

There are many ways to cut concrete and various types of cutting machinery to get it done. In building or concrete demolition projects, the cuts can vary in depth and length. This is why a precise and well-trained hand is needed to ensure that the cuts are created in the exact size they should be.

The type of cut needed for each project should also be used as basis for the type of equipment to be used to cut the concrete. Whether you’re looking to cut curved or straight, deep or subtle lines, there is always the right equipment to get the job done.

If you’re looking for professional concrete cutters for your project then choose a local contractor who has the manpower and machinery to provide the services you need.

Regardless of whether you need to cut concrete to create windows or doors or simply would like to get concrete floor sawing services, professional contractors can get these done for you. In fact, there is a specific machine to ensure safe and precise concrete cutting for your project, and the right contractor should know which one to use.

Picture

Picture courtesy of SEQ Concrete Cutting Pty Ltd

Five methods to ensure safe and efficient concrete cutting on your construction project

Flush cutting
If you need to cut a straight line on a concrete floor then flush cutting is the best option. The flush cutting saw creates a precise straight cut at any depth, making it the perfect tool for cutting concrete or reinforced concrete.

It’s also ideal for cutting stone or bricks. With proper training, a flush cutting saw is generally easy to manoeuvre. It’s considerably smaller too, which makes it a great option for cutting in small or narrow areas that large machines can’t reach.

Hand and ring sawing
Hand saw and ring saw are great cutting machines to use for concrete cutting. They can work wonders especially when manoeuvred by skilled hands. These types of machines are perfect when you need to create precise cuts without much regard to the depth.

These cutting saws are best used for wall sawing, cutting expansion joints and doorways, and removing footpath and concrete slab. They are highly efficient and use a dust and water system to avoid dispersion of debris which could cause disruption of work in your site.

Hydraulic and High-Frequency Sawing
Concrete cutting can be noisy and disruptive. This is why it’s not always the easiest task to manage if you’re working on an indoor project. It can quickly become messy and time-consuming with the preparation, actual cutting, and post-cutting cleanup.

Hydraulic and high-frequency sawing by professional concrete cutters is a quick fix to the problem. These types of cutting saws generate low noise and are fume-free, which make them the perfect option for indoor projects. They’re also easy to manoeuvre, making concrete cutting a lot easier.

Road sawing
Large scale indoor and outdoor projects such as floor or road sawing often require special types of machinery that will ensure that the cuts are precise with the right depth. For these projects, special concrete cutting saws must be used to ensure perfect cuts.

Professional concrete cutting service contractors often use equipment that can create cuts with a depth of 375 mm to 500 mm. These cutting saws can cut through floors, asphalt, and pavements.

Diamond saw cutting
There are two types of diamond concrete cutting saw: the dry cutting saw, and wet cutting saw. The dry cutting saw generate the best result when successional cuts are made on the same spot to increase depth.

Meanwhile, the wet cutting saw can be used continuously as it uses water to prevent dispersion of dust and prevents the saw from overheating. Both cutting saws are often used in large scale projects as they can create precise and smooth cuts on concrete.

Picture

Picture courtesy of SEQ Concrete Cutting Pty Ltd

Concrete removal and demolition

It’s common in renovation projects to alter the size or totally remove concrete, whether it’s concrete floors, slabs, pillars or walls, among many others. Usually, concrete removal is regarded as a messy task that needs a lot of precaution and planning.

While it is true that concrete removal can be stressful, it doesn’t always have to be as costly and complicated of a task as most people regard it to be. With the right professionals, it can be done in the fastest and easiest way possible.

As established earlier, one of the perks of working with concrete cutting and removal contractors is their plethora of high-quality machinery. But more than that, they are the best option for the job because of their training and safety gear. They know how to cut and remove concrete in the safest and non-disruptive manner possible.

Core drilling

Apart from concrete cutting and concrete removal, core drilling is also another highly sought after service from professional contractors. Drilling on concrete is often sought before electrical or plumbing installations in buildings.

A modern core drilling machinery can drill up to 1000 mm in-depth, with a diameter of up to 1200 mm. Professional contractors can do regular drilling, inverted drilling or stitch drilling — all depending on the type of holes needed for your home’s engineering and architectural plan.

When working on a renovation or a new building, knowing what types of concrete services you’ll need from professionals can make the entire process a lot easier for you. You can effectively relay to professional contractors what you need and they can guide you through the processes needed to get it done.

And since a good contractor essentially means easier building and renovation, you must do your due diligence before committing to one. Choose contractors who have the experience and skills needed for the job and are situated locally.


MEP Pojects and high temperatures – do you know the risks?

Heatstroke kills 32 year old former athlete

Picture

Recently the sports world was rocked by the death of a young former football star who died from heatstroke. See the reports from the BBC and CBS news.World temperatures are rising and recently parts of Europe and the USA have experienced some of the hottest recorded temperatures. This last summer Australia also experienced record breaking temperatures.

So what can we do about heatstroke? Well this report from the BBC tells us more about the effects of heat on the body.

Those in construction are at particular risk of suffering heat related illnesses since they are often expected to do hard physical tasks for long hours, often out in the open.


Dealing with hot weather on projects

​It’s important that everyone on your construction project is aware of the risks that high temperatures pose. Everyone must be aware of the early symptoms of heat exhaustion so they can take quick corrective action before the situation deteriorates to full heatstroke. There should always be an adequate supply of cool fresh drinking water and workers must be encouraged to drink lots of water. Workers must be allowed to take frequent rest breaks in a cool environment. Where possible try and start work earlier when the day is still cool. Possibly schedule some tasks for the night – particularly pouring concrete. Rotate workers so that one worker isn’t working on a strenuous task all day.Be aware that people on medication, those taking drugs or consuming excess alcohol and caffeine may be more susceptible to suffering the ill effects of high temperature. Those use to working in more moderate and cooler climates are also not as use to working in hot conditions as others may be who have become acclimatised to these conditions, so it’s important to understand that people will be impacted differently by the heat.

High temperatures will impact productivity, but the construction schedule should not endanger people’s lives. Extreme temperatures above the norm may be reason to lodge a variation claim with the client.

Of course heat doesn’t also impact people’s lives it can impact concrete and other products. Concrete, mortar, adhesives and paints will all dry out rapidly, which could lead to problems with finishing the work as well as cracking and other problems.

Take adequate precautions to ensure that heat doesn’t endanger safety or impact quality on your construction project. Working in a cool office may insulate you from the severe heat while others on the project have to deal with the full impacts of the hot temperatures.

How will your project deal with the high temperatures?

AirCo Pakistan | Maintenence | Troubleshooting | Installations

Air Conditioning Pakistan

Airconditioning in Pakistan can be challenging when it comes to finding a professional service provider. At AirCo Services Pakistan we install and maintain your units keeping international standards in consideration. Our technicians have worked in markets across the globe and with world reknown brands like Daikin, LG, Midea, Gree, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, Hisense, Haier.

We have a dedicated team for VRV units, VRF technology is complicated and requires skilled tools and workmanship to install, commission and maintain the air conditioning units. Airco Pakistan can provide complete services and is fully equipped to solve any HVAC related problems.

For complete technical, operational and maintenance solutions please send us an email on:

sales@airco.pk

Our website: https://www.airco.pk

Providing services across Pakistan.

Representatives in Lahore, Karachi and Islamabad.

Reamer Tool

The drill does not produce the correct hole size some time with the good surface finish. A hole with precision size can be produced with a good finish off a pre-drilled hole using a reamer tool. The process of the enlarging hole is called reaming.

The reamer is commonly used to remove the minimum amount of metal (100 to 150 micron for rough reaming and 5 to 20 micron for fine reaming) from the hole. During reaming operations, the job should be properly supported and rigidly held. A stock wrench of appropriate size for holding the reamer is used. The reamer must be kept in its correct position about the job. It must be rotated slowly, and excessive feed must not be given. It should always be-be turned in the cutting direction. Sufficient amount of cutting fluid should also be used. When removing the reamer, it must be turned in the cutting direction. Reamers with blunt or chipped edges must not be used.

Adjustable hand reamer tool

Various kinds of reamers are classified and described as under:

  1. Hand Reamer
  2. Machine reamers
  3. Taper reamer
  4. Spirally fluted reamer
  5. Straight fluted reamer
  6. Parallel reamer
  7. Adjustable reamer
  8. Expanding reamer

Some common types of the reamer used in fitting workshops are discussed as under.

1. Hand Reamer:
It is operated by hand to finish the holes and remove its ovality. Its cutting edges are backed off in the same manner as those of twist drills to give suitable clearance. It is made up of carbon or high-speed steel material. It is used for excellent internal turning in the hole by placing a tap wrench on the square end of the reamer.

2. Machine Reamer:
It is designed for slow speeds for use on drill presses, lathes, vertical milling machines, etc. It is chamfered on the front side of cutting edge. It possesses straight or tapered shanks and comprises of either straight or spiral flutes.

3. Taper reamer:
It is widely used for finishing taper holes smoothly with precision. It is also used to provide a taper to a drilled hole when a taper pin is to be used. It is performed with either straight or spiral flutes. It has spaces ground into the cutting edges or teeth to prevent overloading the entire length of each tooth of the reamer. These spaces are staggered on the many teeth to help in stock removal.

4. Spirally fluted reamer:
It performs greater shearing action than one with straight flute.

Is Your Construction Correspondence Losing You Variation Claims or Projects?

Picture

Good communication in construction is essential. Many problems arise because of poor communication, or when our messages are misunderstood.

Unfortunately many in construction don’t realize how important it is to be able to communicate properly. Many don’t see the necessity of being able to write properly. Yet, project managers have to write letters all the time. Some of these letters could literally be worth millions of dollars. Why wouldn’t we want to put the effort into producing a clear and succinct letter that will convince our clients and customers to award a project to our company, or grant the variation claim we’ve submitted.

So let’s have a quick English lesson – a lesson on writing project letters!
Letters should:

  • Have a date.
  • Have a unique reference number.
  • Be addressed to the correct person (the contract normally specifies who that person is, as well as who should be sent copies. If you’re unsure contact the company to find out who the right person is). Oh, by the way, do spell their name correctly – you don’t want to annoy the person before they’ve even started reading your letter!
  • Have a heading, including the project reference name and number (letters to the client should use the reference name and number in the contract document), and a second heading line containing the subject matter.
  • Have an introduction, normally a brief overview of the subject within the letter.
  • Include the body, containing the facts and supporting information (where the supporting information is lengthy or includes numbers, calculations, and diagrams, consideration should be given to inserting these as appendices, and including only the summary of the documents in the body of the letter, referring the reader to the relevant appendix or attachment).
  • Have a conclusion which summarises the facts and indicates the required future course of action.
  • Be logical – state the facts simply and in a logical manner that is easy to follow. Don’t assume the person reading the letter is familiar with the project, or discussions that have occurred on the project.
  • Be confined to one topic, or a few similar topics. Rather write a new letter for a different unrelated topic.
  • Be concise and in simple language. Avoid lengthy sentences.
  • Not be contradictory.
  • Not use emotive language. Don’t get emotional or abusive. Simply state the facts. You don’t want to later regret the things you wrote.
  • Be checked for spelling and typographical errors (if you know your grammar is poor request, someone, to check the letter). As a young project manager, my manager always checked variation claim letters before I submitted them to the client. Frequently they came back with multiple errors highlighted in red ink – yes, it did feel like I was back at school, but they were important lessons.
  • Be arranged in easily readable paragraphs. Don’t just ramble on, with one thought leading into the next one.
  • Avoid using slang.
  • Ensure that when acronyms and abbreviations are used that these are explained, or are clearly understood by the reader and that they are used consistently in the letter.
  • Be numbered correctly and consistently when it’s required.
  • Use consistent text (resist the urge to use text that is in capitals, bold, in color or in italics to highlight a point).
  • Use exclamation and question marks sparingly.
  • Quote the correct clauses from the contract document, the specific reference from the tender documents or the applicable drawing numbers.
  • Be double-checked to ensure that all calculations and figures are correct and that they tie up.

Poorly written letters are often not treated with the seriousness they deserve, and letters which use incorrect facts and figures could cause the client to doubt the authenticity of the figures.

Don’t assume the person reading the letter will have a grasp of all the facts, or know what you are talking about.

Posts navigation

1 2
Scroll to top